IGI Researchers Improve Efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9 DNA repair

IGI researchers have recently made significant strides in improving the efficiency of CRISPR-Cas9 technology, as well as our understanding of its versatility in repairing genetic information within a cell.  In a paper published today in the journal Nature Biotechnology, IGI Scientific Director, Jacob Corn, and IGI postdoc Chris Richardson reveal that they have invented a new approach that improves the patching efficiency of Cas9-induced DNA breaks.  The new technique allows researchers to patch a section of DNA by inserting different genetic information,  and it is especially useful when trying to repair genetic mutations that cause hereditary diseases such as sickle cell disease or severe combined immune deficiency.  The precision of CRISPR-Cas9 technology in cutting DNA at precise locations has propelled a revolution in genetic engineering worldwide.  The process of making exact and accurate changes to the genetic code after a DNA break, however, has proved to be a much more challenging process, but this new approach will enable researchers to more efficiently alter the genetic code by using CRISPR-Cas9 technology to accurately insert new genetic information into the break.

Enhancing homology-directed genome editing by catalytically active and inactive CRISPR-Cas9 using asymmetric donor DNA 
Nature Biotechnology | Chris Richardson, Jacob Corn, et al | January 20, 2016

Press Release: Advance improves cutting and pasting with CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing
UC Berkeley News | Robert Sanders | January 20, 2016

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